Tishkoff PLC

Tishkoff PLC Experienced attorneys specializing in business and employment litigation, business law, contracts, real estate, intellectual property, mediation, and severe injury.
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Tishkoff is a boutique litigation law firm specializing in litigation, business lawsuits, contracts, employment and bankruptcy. Tishkoff proudly serves clients across the country and has established an exceptional record of results. The firm is rated AV Preeminent by Martindale-Hubbell, its highest rating.

Operating as usual

A former employee accuses JPMorgan Chase of failing to stop what she said was racially driven bullying. Wall Street has ...
11/20/2020
What Counts as Race Discrimination? A Suit Against JPMorgan Is a Test

A former employee accuses JPMorgan Chase of failing to stop what she said was racially driven bullying. Wall Street has come under growing scrutiny for how it treats people of color, and Black employees in particular. #EmploymentLaw https://nyti.ms/38BuKCv

A former employee accuses JPMorgan Chase of failing to stop what she said was racially driven bullying. The bank says race had nothing to do with it.

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission approved changes to its workplace religious discrimination guidance to ...
11/18/2020
EEOC to Update Religious Bias Guidance With High Court Precedent

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission approved changes to its workplace religious discrimination guidance to account for recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions on religious defenses and accommodations, teeing it up for White House review. https://bit.ly/2Uji1Mk

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission approved changes to its workplace religious discrimination guidance to account for recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions on religious defenses and accommodations, teeing it up for White House review.

You may not be able to salvage the personal relationship, but you can save yourself some money and hassle as you end you...
10/31/2020
Best Way to End a Business Partnership — Make a Plan

You may not be able to salvage the personal relationship, but you can save yourself some money and hassle as you end your business partnership. #BusinessLaw

A change in the partnership may cause you to think about closing. Here are alternatives to ending the partnership, and how to prepare a dissolution plan.

Employment discrimination happens when an employee or job applicant is treated unfavorably because of his or her race, s...
10/30/2020
Types of Discrimination in the Workplace

Employment discrimination happens when an employee or job applicant is treated unfavorably because of his or her race, skin color, national origin, gender, disability, religion, or age. http://bit.ly/2nTA0fo

What is discrimination? Learn about various types of employment discrimination, laws, legal protections, and how to handle workplace discrimination issues.

The attorneys and staff at Tishkoff wish everyone a night full of frights and a bag full of delights.Hope all enjoy a Sa...
10/30/2020

The attorneys and staff at Tishkoff wish everyone a night full of frights and a bag full of delights.
Hope all enjoy a Safe & Happy Halloween!
Do not hesitate to contact the attorneys at Tishkoff if you have questions regarding litigation, or business or employment law.
Contact information for the Tishkoff attorneys is available at: https://tish.law/.
Stay in touch with Tishkoff: http://bit.ly/TishkoffPLC
#tishlaw #annarbobusinesslawyers #trickortreat #happyhalloween #2020staysafe #maskup #legalfriends

Congratulations to Tishkoff attorney Helena Taminski on her success in passing the Michigan Bar!  Ms. Taminski is very e...
10/29/2020

Congratulations to Tishkoff attorney Helena Taminski on her success in passing the Michigan Bar! Ms. Taminski is very excited to be in the process of admission to the State Bar of Michigan and plans to focus her practice with Ann Arbor, Michigan, based Tishkoff on business and employment litigation. She is looking forward to her swearing-in ceremonies for the Michigan state and federal courts.
Do not hesitate to contact the attorneys at Tishkoff if you have questions regarding litigation, or business or employment law. Contact information for the Tishkoff attorneys is available at: https://tish.law/. Stay in touch with Tishkoff: http://bit.ly/TishkoffPLC
#tishlaw #congratulations #mibar #lawyerslife #attorney #law #lawlife #legalfriend

Tishkoff welcomes our new associate attorney Helena M. Taminski.Helena M. Taminski, JD. is a Michigan native, born and r...
10/09/2020

Tishkoff welcomes our new associate attorney Helena M. Taminski.

Helena M. Taminski, JD. is a Michigan native, born and raised in Macomb County. Ms. Taminski graduated, cm laude, with her Bachelor of Arts degree from University of Michigan-Dearborn in 2012. Ms. Taminski attended University of Toledo College of Law on a full Merit Scholarship and graduated with her Juris Doctor in 2020. During law school, Ms. Taminski was an Associate Member of Toledo Law Review and a student member of the Michigan Bar Health Care and Business Law sections. Ms. Taminski gained experience as a law clerk for two corporate legal departments and a litigation firm. She is excited to be in Ann Arbor and working at Tishkoff on commercial and employment litigation matters.

Rest in peace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, may your memory be a blessing.Last week, more than a thousand people gathered...
09/29/2020

Rest in peace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg,
may your memory be a blessing.
Last week, more than a thousand people gathered on the steps of the Supreme Court to mourn the passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died September 18, 2020, from cancer at age 87.

“Our nation has lost a justice of historic stature,” Chief Justice John Roberts said. “We at the Supreme Court have lost a cherished colleague. Today we mourn but with confidence that future generations will remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg as we knew her, a tireless and resolute champion of justice.”

Ginsburg was born and grew up in Brooklyn, New York. Her older sister died when she was a baby, and her mother died shortly before Ginsburg graduated from high school. She earned her bachelor's degree at Cornell University and married Martin D. Ginsburg, becoming a mother before starting law school at Harvard, where she was one of the few women in her class. Ginsburg transferred to Columbia Law School, where she graduated joint first in her class. After law school, Ginsburg entered academia. She was a professor at Rutgers Law School and Columbia Law School, teaching civil procedure as one of the few women in her field.

She was an unlikely pioneer, a diminutive and shy woman, whose soft voice and large glasses hid an intellect and attitude that, as one colleague put it, was "tough as nails."
Architect of the legal fight for women's rights in the 1970s. Ginsburg spent much of her legal career as an advocate for gender equality and women’s rights, winning many arguments before the Supreme Court. She advocated as a volunteer attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union and was a member of its board of directors and one of its general counsel.

In Weinberger v. Wiesenfeld, her client was fighting laws borne of a time when women generally were not expected to work unless circumstances forced it, while men were expected to see worth and obligation in their outsized ability to earn money. As she made her case, pausing to let each clause sink in, Ginsburg paraphrased the words of the first woman to serve as a district court judge in arguing why this unequal treatment of the sexes was wrong. Such “a gender line, helps to keep women not on a pedestal, but in a cage,” Ginsburg said, her words full and broad. It reinforces, she continued, the assumption that working for pay “is primarily the prerogative of men.”

In 1980, President Jimmy Carter appointed her to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, where she served until her appointment by President William Jefferson Clinton to the Supreme Court in 1993. She was not first on his list. For months, Clinton flirted with other potential nominees, and some women's rights activists withheld their active support because they were worried about Ginsburg's views on abortion. She had been publicly critical of the legal reasoning in Roe v. Wade. But in the background, Marty Ginsburg was lobbying hard for his wife. And finally, Ruth Ginsburg was invited for a meeting with the president. As one White House official put it afterward, Clinton “fell for her — hook, line and sinker.” So did the Senate. She was confirmed by a 96-3 vote.

Between O'Connor's retirement in 2006 and the appointment of Sonia Sotomayor in 2009, Ginsburg was the only female justice on the Supreme Court. During that time, Ginsburg became more forceful with her dissents, notably in Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. (2007). Ginsburg's dissenting opinion was credited with inspiring the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, which was signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2009. This statute made it easier for employees to win pay discrimination claims.

Upon hearing of Ginsburg’s death, former U.S. Attorney and law professor Joyce Vance tweeted, “We should honor the life of RGB, American hero, by refusing to give in, refusing to back down, fighting for civil rights of all people and demanding our leaders honor the rule of law. This is our fight now.”

Ginsburg’s death has brought widespread mourning among those who saw her as a champion for equal rights for women, LBGQ Americans, minorities, and those who believe in the role of government is to make sure that all Americans enjoy equal justice under law.

Admirers called her “The Notorious R.B.G.” after the rapper B.I.G., who wore clothing with her image on it, dressed as her for Halloween, and bought RBG rag dolls and coloring books that told her story.

Mourner’s came from all over the country to show their respect. One said, “Before she started women could not by a house open a charge card in a department store without their husbands’ signature.” Another said, “There’s not that many people that can really change the world, but she did.” And another, “she had three strikes against her, she was a woman, she was Jewish, and she was a mother.” A mother who was there reminded herself and her children we are so fortunate to live at this time in this life with the memory of Ruth Batter Ginsburg.

Rest in peace Justice Ginsburg, may your memory be a blessing.

Sources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruth_Bader_Ginsburg
https://www.history.com/topics/womens-history/ruth-bader-ginsburg

Do not hesitate to contact the attorneys at Tishkoff if you have questions regarding litigation, or business or employment law.

Contact information for the Tishkoff attorneys: https://tish.law/.

Stay in touch with Tishkoff: http://bit.ly/TishkoffPLC

#tishlaw #annarborbusinesslawyers #RBG #equaljusticeunderlaw #championofjustice #legalfriend

Tishkoff PLC is pleased and honored to welcome aboard Danielle Kurasz is a graduate of Eastern Michigan University, wher...
09/23/2020

Tishkoff PLC is pleased and honored to welcome aboard Danielle Kurasz is a graduate of Eastern Michigan University, where she earned her Bachelor of Arts in International Affairs in 2019. She has over four years of customer service experience she developed while concurrently pursuing her undergraduate degree. She enjoys spending time with her family and friends, traveling, reading and running.

Tishkoff would like to wish everyone a Safe and Happy Labor Day Weekend!Do not hesitate to contact the attorneys at Tish...
09/04/2020

Tishkoff would like to wish everyone a Safe and Happy Labor Day Weekend!

Do not hesitate to contact the attorneys at Tishkoff if you have questions regarding litigation, or business or employment law. Contact information for the Tishkoff attorneys is available at Tishkoff’s web site: https://tish.law/. Stay in touch with Tishkoff: http://bit.ly/TishkoffPLC

#tishlaw #annarborbusinesslawyers #laborday #covid #work #longweekend #staysafe #workersday #legalfriends

Can employers face liability for failing to send sick workers home, or enforcing social distancing or mask-wearing guida...
08/26/2020

Can employers face liability for failing to send sick workers home, or enforcing social distancing or mask-wearing guidance?

The Coronavirus relief bill, recently unveiled by Senate Republicans, would make it harder for workers to sue their employers if they get sick on the job.
Historically, employers are rarely found liable for employee deaths tied to the workplace. That is because the legal bar for proving fault is high, and because states often restrict such complaints to their workers’ compensation systems, which typically limit payouts to a portion of a worker’s salary, coverage of their medical bills and disability compensation. However, the new Coronavirus has created a global health and economic crisis, responsible for the death of more than 170,000 people in the U.S., while straining resources and institutions.

Current CDC guidance advises that employers may permit workers who have been exposed to COVID-19, but remain without symptoms, to continue to work, provided they adhere to additional safety precautions. In the event that these employees become sickened from Coronavirus, employees’ loved ones may contend the companies that fail to protect their workers and should be required to compensate their family members. Some workers who survived the Coronavirus may sue their employers to recover medical bills, future earnings, and other damages paid out.

This is a new legal front that highlights the legal risks emerging with the re-opening of workplaces. Limiting liability from these risks has garnered broad support from Republicans in Congress. They argue businesses need greater protection from lawsuits by customers or workers who catch the virus and argue that their employer was the source of the infection. Without new statutory protections, Republicans argue that businesses will be hampered by lawsuits, which could slow down efforts to reopen businesses.

Business groups, such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), are lobbying for Congress to pass the above legislation. The Coronavirus relief bill that Senate Republicans recently unveiled would protect companies, schools, and churches from being held liable for coronavirus infections beginning in December 2019, unless they acted with willful misconduct or engaged in grossly negligent behavior. Cases where an employer acted with gross negligence—which are not precluded by the Senate proposal and sometimes can proceed outside the workers’ compensation system—could result in out-of-court settlements or end up before sympathetic juries.

An example of the new litigation involving employers and their employees emanating from the Coronavirus pandemic is a recent lawsuit against Safeway and Albertsons. In that case, the employee, Pedro Zuniga, worked for 22 years handling produce in a Safeway distribution center in Tracy, Calif. In mid-March, he and other workers complained to supervisors that the work environment wasn’t safe because colleagues were coming in sick. Paul Matiasic, an attorney representing the claim by Mr. Zuniga’s family, said management threatened to retaliate against workers if they didn’t show up as the distribution center expanded its hours to meet increased food-shopping demands.

Safeway/Albertsons posted a “Team Talk” memo in the distribution center titled “Coronavirus Risks: Fact vs. Fiction.” The sign, which bears the logo of Safeway parent Albertsons Companies, recommended against wearing a mask in the workplace. “If you are healthy, a mask will not protect you from the respiratory drops an infected person coughs out,” the sign read. “Open areas of the mask can let those drops in.”

On April 4, Mr. Zuniga—trembling, coughing and feverish—went to an area hospital after getting a Covid-19 test, which came back positive. The next day he was transferred to intensive care, where he was put on a ventilator and placed in a medically induced coma. He died eight days later at age 52.

Norma Zuniga, his widow and the mother of their five children, in May sued Safeway and Albertsons for gross negligence and wrongful death in Alameda County Superior Court seeking general and punitive damages. The lawsuit contends that the grocer failed to follow March 9 guidance from OSHA aimed at preparing workplaces for Covid-19, which called for isolating sick workers. It said the grocer misled workers when it said that wearing protective equipment wouldn’t help prevent the spread of the disease.

In July, Safeway and Albertsons filed a motion to dismiss the complaint on the grounds that it didn’t meet the criteria for proceeding outside the workers’ compensation system. It also had the case moved to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California. The grocer denied that it failed to take appropriate workplace safety precautions. It said that as of March 20, neither the CDC’s nor California’s official guidance recommended wearing masks and that state occupational safety and health interim guidance at the time said masks didn’t protect people from airborne infectious disease. It also said that state health and safety officials inspected the distribution center on April 15 regarding Covid-19 procedures and found no violations.

Do not hesitate to contact Tishkoff if you have questions regarding litigation, or business or employment law: https://tish.law/

Stay in touch with Tishkoff: http://bit.ly/TishkoffPLC

Sources:
https://www.wsj.com/articles/families-file-first-wave-of-covid-19-lawsuits-against-companies-over-worker-deaths-11596137454?st=wenh4dfcvqezuk5&reflink=article_email_share
https://www.cnbc.com/2020/06/19/coronavirus-lawsuits-businesses-and-labor-groups-clash-over-liability.html
https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/rise-in-employment-law-claims-knowing-56778/
https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/covid-19-lawsuits

#tishlaw #annarborbusinesslawyers #covid19 #litigation #socialdistancing #staysafe&healthy #legalfriends

What are antitrust laws?  Antitrust laws, also referred to as competition laws, are statutes developed by the U.S. gover...
08/13/2020

What are antitrust laws?

Antitrust laws, also referred to as competition laws, are statutes developed by the U.S. government to protect consumers from predatory business practices.

Antitrust laws ensure that fair competition exists in an open-market economy. These laws have evolved along with the market, vigilantly guarding against would-be monopolies and disruptions to the productive ebb and flow of competition.

Antitrust laws help make sure the different businesses in a marketplace are operating on a level playing field. Some companies use unfair or deceptive practices in order to get a larger share of the market. If antitrust laws did not exist, consumers would not benefit from different options or competition in the marketplace.

Antitrust laws are applied to a wide range of questionable business activities, including market allocation, bid-rigging, price-fixing, and monopolies. Core U.S. antitrust law was created by three pieces of legislation: the Sherman Anti-Trust Act of 1890, the Federal Trade Commission Act, and the Clayton Antitrust Act. The Sherman Anti-Trust Act intended to prevent unreasonable “contract, combination or conspiracy in restraint of trade.” The Federal Trade Commission Act bans “unfair methods of competition” and “unfair or deceptive acts or practices.” The Clayton Antitrust Act addresses specific practices that the Sherman Anti-Trust Act may not address. According to the FTC, these include preventing mergers and acquisitions that may “substantially lessen competition or tend to create a monopoly.” In addition to these federal statutes, most states have antitrust laws that are enforced by state attorneys general or private plaintiffs. Many of these statutes are based on the federal antitrust laws.
Do not hesitate to contact the attorneys at Tishkoff if you have questions regarding litigation, or business or employment law.
Contact Tishkoff: https://tish.law/
Stay in touch with Tishkoff: http://bit.ly/TishkoffPLC
Sources:
https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/competition-guidance/guide-antitrust-laws/antitrust-laws
https://www.investopedia.com/
https://www.justice.gov/atr/file/800691/download
#tishlaw #annarborbusinesslawyers #antitrustlaws #levelplayingfield #shermanact #companies #laws #rights #legalfriends

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407 North Main Street
Ann Arbor, MI
48104

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Monday 08:30 - 17:30
Tuesday 08:30 - 17:30
Wednesday 08:30 - 17:30
Thursday 08:30 - 17:30
Friday 08:30 - 17:30

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Tishkoff is a boutique litigation law firm specializing in litigation, business lawsuits, contracts, and severe injury. Tishkoff proudly serves clients across the country and has established an exceptional record of results. The firm is rated AV Preeminent by Martindale-Hubbell, its highest rating.

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